Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Not at all old fashioned or stuffy...

.....but, alas, a public radio favorite. On the other hand, this is live and unaccompanied, and is a sign of welcome incursions of Robert Fripp-ery into popular music.

9 comments:

Generic said...

Half the people I'm listening to now are (were?) regulars on "Prairie Home Companion." Who'd have thunk it would come to this?

Generic said...

Pleasent. Clever. But in what sense "popular."?

Generic said...

Also charming.

Generic said...

And playful.

Tulkinghorn said...

The guy whose site I poached this from maintains an 'elopement candidate' list and put her on it.... Don't know about that clenched-fist- in-the-female-icon tattoo though.

"Popular" as in "intended for as broad and audience as possible without pretensions or preconditions". She calls it 'classical' though, with hip production techniques -- Fripp/Eno not name checked....

GoJoe said...

The violin looping reminds me of Andrew Bird...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHkqoamZ76U&feature=fvst

Generic said...

As in seeking a mass rather than a niche audience? I'd say that's exactly what she isn't doing. Found an interview in which she talks about refusing to sign with major record labels because they'd try to make her more mainstream.

I'd say you're using a different standard to determine popularity here than you would with, say, TV. This is PBS or at best cable music, not broadcast network music.

Muffy St. Bernard said...

There has been an explosion of delay-pedal musicians during the last year or so, and I wonder how it started out or where it's going?

I think this wave started with buskers and street musicians...I remember seeing street musicians many years ago in Toronto who used this technique: mixing board, guitar, drum machine, delay pedal.

As the pedals have gotten more sophisticated and automated, the technique seems to have grown (and become less glitchy) to the point where now it's almost a genre in itself...I'm thinking Pamela Z and Zoe Keating.

Generic said...

I think the brains of people capable of the mental dexterity required for something like this must simply be different from mine. Forced to admit I'm enormously impressed. As for the use to which the dexterity is being put, I reserve judgement -- although a couple of her album listings on iTunes carry "explicit" warnings, which is a good start.